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Serving Up Freshness by the Mouthful

Columns Surf and Turf

August 11, 2013

Story By: Kyle Galdeira | Photos by: Leah Friel

In just a few weeks since its grand opening, King’s Shabu Shabu has already developed a loyal following by offering customers a vast array of fresh seafood selections, tasty shabu shabu options and Cajun-style combos that take one’s dining experience to the next level.

The restaurant is situated conveniently at the corner of McCully and Young Streets, offers ample free parking and features a bright and inviting dining area with tables suited for groups of all sizes.

King’s Shabu Shabu offers up Cajun Combos, which are prepared by the restaurant’s skilled and friendly staff, and brought directly to the table. Various combination platters include Cajun Combo #1 ($48), which features Lobster, Crawfish, Mussels, Shrimp and Clams. These bountiful combo platters are crafted with customers’ choices of heat levels, including mild, medium and volcanic, as well as garlic butter.

Various live seafood options such as oysters, abalone, king crab, Dungeness crab and lobster (available seasonally at market price) are available both sashimi style and for cooking in the hot pot.

“The difference between live seafood and frozen seafood is a sweetness and freshness that you taste right away and smell in the broth,” says assistant manager Evalyn Luo. “By adding fresh seafood to your broth, it enhances the flavor. You will realize what a seafood broth is supposed to taste like.”

King’s Shabu Shabu also offers Kobe Beef ($7.99 for 4 ounces and $15.99 for 8 ounces) as the tender, marbled beef is sliced thin right in front of customers before they are left to delve into their unique shabu shabu creation. Luo explains that the Tomato Beef and Thai Tom Yum broths ($10.99 each) serve as signature soups and help bring out the flavor of the tender steak.

Customers prepare their one-of-a-kind meal by submerging the desired meat or vegetables in a pot of the bold, boiling broths and swishing back and forth several times. The term shabu shabu directly translates to “swish swish,” mimicking the sound one makes while cooking the food.

“We offer two styles of dining with shabu shabu and Cajun cuisine,” Luo says. “We’re dealing with fresh, live seafood — that’s what sets us apart from other shabu shabu restaurants.”

King’s Shabu Shabu

1110 McCully St., Honolulu
946-8833
Open daily, 5 p.m.-3 a.m.

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