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Crab Bucket

Digest Step Up to the Plate

November 24, 2013

Story By: Andy Beth Miller | Photos by: Lawrence Tabudlo

A CLOSER LOOK AT THIS WEEK’S HOUSE SPECIAL: STONE CRAB ($40 PER POUND)

If there’s one thing this G.R.I.T.S. (Girl Raised In The South) knows, it’s how to get her hands dirty! That’s right, I ain’t “skeered” — and at the Crab Bucket, a Honolulu restaurant getting rave reviews for its “hands-on” approach to Southern-inspired seafood, that get down, roll-up-your-sleeves-and-dig-in mentality is just what separates the men from the boys.

Fresh out of the water today is the signature ingredient to Crab Bucket’s seasonal featured dish: succulent Stone Crab ($40 per pound). So, put a bib on it ya’ll, because this shellfish is literally finger lickin’ good!

The Stone Crab is shipped fresh from Florida and is only available from October to May. “Frozen is just not the same,” explains manager David Hoang. “That’s why it’s seasonal on our menu — we only want to serve our customers the freshest catch.”

The Stone Crab stands on its own two legs, served simply with a garnish of fresh lemon slices and a side of Crab Bucket’s made-from-scratch mustard sauce. The mayo-mustard has a creamy base with a bit of horseradish bite to it, giving it a sweet ‘n’ sour tang that perfectly complements this fresh catch.

Stone Crab meat is pleasantly plump and filling, not flaky. Its flesh has a surprising sweetness to it versus the saltiness so often attributed to its King and Snow Crab counterparts.

Both the attitude and atmosphere at Crab Bucket are friendly with no-frills or fuss. “Customers are family,” says Hoang. “We believe everybody has a story and we want them to know they’re welcome here.”

Stone Crab may also be enjoyed with Crab Bucket’s house sauce, a heavenly blend of seven top-secret ingredients. It begins with fresh garlic, rich and creamy butter as well as zesty cajun spices. “The house sauce is by far our most popular of the sauces,” says Hoang. “People order it with everything.”

Crab Bucket

1020 Keeaumoku St., Honolulu
591-2722
Monday through Friday, 3 p.m. to 11 p.m.
Saturday and Sunday, noon to 11 p.m.

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