Noontime Noodles

Columns What's for Lunch?

April 20, 2014

Story By: Rachel Breit | Photos by: Rachel Breit

Noodle enthusiasts have long turned to Chinese cuisine for their fill of the stringy food. How long exactly? Scientific evidence indicates nothing short of 4,000 years. Archeologists’ discovery of ancient noodles preserved in a sealed bowl in northwestern China suggest Asia, not Italy, as the birthplace of the dish.

The delicate process required to make noodles, which involves grinding grain into dough, stretching the dough out, then cutting it into shape, shows the lengths ancient people went beyond simple nourishment to satisfy a craving for good eats. Modern day desires for noodles simply prove what diehard fans we humans are. Fortunately, Golden Palace Seafood Restaurant dishes up toothsome tendrils the traditional way. (No need to reinvent the wheel here.) So, get your chop-sticks ready for three different noodle-based favorites.

A crunch is at the heart of House Special Chow Mein ($6.95). Crispy Hong Kong-style egg noodles are topped with succulent stir-fried shrimp, squid, fish, scallops, chicken and vegetables with a light, oyster sauce-based gravy that seeps into all the right places.

Even though it’s not on the menu, don’t hesitate to ask for Vegetable Chow Funn ($6.25), a ready vegetarian option. Thick ribbons of rice noodles loaded with fried tofu, carrots, mushrooms, choy sum, broccoli and baby corn shine under a lacquer of clear gravy.

Pickled, shredded cabbage is what makes Stir-Fried Rice Noodle ($5.75) pop. Brined in-house, the sour cabbage adds a touch of tang to the tangle of thin rice noodles that also includes shredded fresh-made char siu, shrimp, scrambled egg, bell pepper, onions and still-crunchy bean sprouts.

With large portions at reasonable prices, clearly Golden Palace is the place to get strung out on noodles. Dishes can be customized to your liking and made with or without MSG — manager Gary Lam says it won’t affect the final product. And the restaurant also offers a variety of classic dim sum, including flaky Ma Tai Soo ($2.29 for 3 pieces) pastry filled with minced water chestnut, turnip and char siu.

Golden Palace Seafood Restaurant

111 N. King St., Honolulu
521-8268
7 a.m.-10 p.m. daily Dim sum starts at 7 a.m. daily

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